Prince Harry hard at work visiting conservation project in Epping Forest while William goes skiing in Swiss Alps


GETTING HIS HANDS DIRTY

Younger prince meets with schoolchildren and plants a tree at Wood Pasture Restoration Project

PRINCE HARRY wasn’t afraid to get his hands dirty as he helped out with a conservation project in Epping Forest — while brother Wills lived it up in Verbier.

Harry met with local schoolchildren to view the Wood Pasture Restoration Project, and he was quick to pick up a spade and get stuck into planting a tree.

Prince Harry meets Lucky, a rare English longhorn cow, during a visit to a conservation project

News Group Newspapers Ltd

Prince Harry meets Lucky, a rare English longhorn cow, during a visit to a conservation project

He planted a tree at the Wood Forest Restoration Project in Epping Forest, Essex

PA:Press Association

He planted a tree at the Wood Forest Restoration Project in Epping Forest, Essex

The prince also met with local schoolchildren and chatted to them about the importance of conservation

PA:Press Association

The prince also met with local schoolchildren and chatted to them about the importance of conservation

The 32-year-old dressed down in a fleece and desert boots while hec.

He also met former Paratrooper Sam Hobbs, 21, who now works as a forest ranger.

Sam showed Harry his prosthetic limb, which was fitted after he lost part of his leg following a serious nerve injury.

Harry met Lucky’s calf as learned about the tradition of using grazing cattle to help keep pastures open in the forest

PA:Press Association

Harry met Lucky’s calf as learned about the tradition of using grazing cattle to help keep pastures open in the forest

The forest is part of the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy

Getty Images

The forest is part of the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy

His trip came as brother Prince William went skiing in the Swiss resort of Verbier

Getty Images

His trip came as brother Prince William went skiing in the Swiss resort of Verbier


The busy prince also came face to face with Lucky — a rare English longhorn cow — and her calf when he learnt about the tradition of using grazing cattle to help keep pastures open in Epping Forest.

The forest is part of the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy, which is a project to create a network of forests and woodlands around the globe.



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